CELA 2015 Conference, March 24-28, 2015

Speakers

Lauren Bon 2008-0809_300dpi211

Keynote Speaker: Lauren Bon, The Metabolic Studio

Sponsored by the Beach Museum of Art, the Prairie Studies Initiative, the Academic Excellence Fund, and the KSU Department of Art.

The Intermountain West and Beyond

Ten Year project in reconnecting Los Angeles with the water that feeds began with Not a Cornfield, 2005-2006 and culminates with her current work, Bending the River Back into the City. Ms. Bon’s practice looks at the Inter Mountain West—the vast landscape whose peaks and valleys include the Great Basin and three major rivers the Columbia, Colorado and Rio Grande River. Her talk will include both a description of her realized works and the context that her studio is working within to create a sustainable prophetic landscape in the Inter Mountain West.

View the CELA 2015 keynote address

Fellows Keynote Panel:


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Kristina Hill, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning at University of California, Berkeley

Keynote Panel Moderator

Hill is an Associate Professor at the University of California at Berkeley, and is currently focused on developing proposals for urban adaptation to climate change in the San Francisco Bay area, by learning from international examples. She co-edited and authored the book Ecology and Design: Frameworks for Learning (Island Press, 2002), and has published numerous book chapters and articles in scientific and professional journals. Hill lectures internationally on ecology and design, and is currently working on a book about urban adaptation to sea level rise and flooding for Springer Publishers. She has been recognized as a Fellow of the Institute for Urban Design, and as a Fulbright Scholar. Her research and consulting work has been funded by the US National Science Foundation and clients in the US and abroad. Her most recent professional project was the Water Management Strategy for Greater New Orleans, where she advised a team of designers and engineers on water-based site and system design. She received a Master of Landscape Architecture with distinction from Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design, and a Doctor of Philosophy in landscape architecture, with a minor in ecology, from Harvard University.


Richard Forman, Ph.D., Research Professor of Advanced Environmental Studies in the Field of Landscape Ecology at Harvard University

Richard T. T. Forman is a Research Professor at Harvard University where he teaches ecology in the Graduate School of Design, and formerly also taught in Harvard College.  His primary scholarly interest is linking science with spatial pattern to interweave nature and people on the land.  Often considered to be a “father” of landscape ecology and of road ecology, he also helps spearhead urban ecology.  Other research interests include changing land mosaics, conservation and land-use planning, towns, and a netway system for transportation.

He received a Haverford College B.S., University of Pennsylvania Ph.D., and two honorary doctoral degrees.  He formerly taught at the Escuela Agricola Panamericana, University of Wisconsin and Rutgers University, and received the Lindback Foundation Award for Excellence in Teaching.  He served as president or vice-president of three professional societies, and has received awards and honors in France, Colombia, England, Italy, China, Czech Republic, Australia, and the USA.  Internationally, he deciphers widespread spatial patterns of nature and people, and catalyzes the flow of ideas in ecological science and related fields for society.

Professor Forman has authored numerous articles; his books include Landscape Ecology (1986), the award-winning Land Mosaics(1995), Landscape Ecology Principles in Landscape Architecture and Land-Use Planning (1996), Road Ecology (2003), Mosaico territorial para la region metropolitana de Barcelona (2004), Urban Regions: Ecology and Planning Beyond the City (2008), and Urban Ecology: Science of Cities (2014).


Wes Jackson, Ph.D., President of the Land Institute in Salina, Kansas

 Wes Jackson, President of The Land Institute, was born in 1936 on a farm near Topeka, Kansas. After attending Kansas Wesleyan (B.A Biology, 1958), he studied botany (M.A. University of Kansas, 1960) and genetics (Ph.D. North Carolina State University, 1967). He was a professor of biology at Kansas Wesleyan and later established the Environmental Studies department at California State University, Sacramento, where he became a tenured full professor. He resigned that position in 1976 and returned to Kansas to found The Land Institute.

Dr. Jackson’s writings include both papers and books. His most recent works, Nature as Measure (2011) and Consulting the Genius of the Place: An Ecological Approach to a New Agriculture (2010),were both published by Counterpoint Press. The Virtues of Ignorance: Complexity, Sustainability, and the Limits of Knowledge (2008) and Rooted in the Land: Essays on Community and Place (1996), were co-edited with William Vitek. Becoming Native to This Place, 1994, sketches his vision for the resettlement of America’s rural communities. Altars of Unhewn Stone appeared in 1987 and Meeting the Expectations of the Land, edited with Wendell Berry and Bruce Colman, was published in 1984. New Roots for Agriculture, 1980, outlines the basis for the agricultural research at The Land Institute.

The work of The Land Institute has been featured extensively in the popular media including The Atlantic Monthly, Audubon, National Geographic, Time Magazine, Yes! Magazine, The MacNeil-Lehrer News Hour, and National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered.” Life magazine named Wes Jackson as one of 18 individuals they predict will be among the 100 “important Americans of the 20th century.” In the November 2005 issue, Smithsonian named him one of “35 Who Made a Difference.” He was included in Rolling Stone’s “100 Agents of Change” in March, 2009 and in Ingram’s “50 Kansans You Should Know” in January 2011.

Wes Jackson is a recipient of the Pew Conservation Scholars award (1990), a MacArthur Fellowship (1992), Right Livelihood Award (Stockholm), known as “Alternative Nobel Prize” (2000), and the Louis Bromfield Award (2010). He has received five honorary doctorates. In 2007 he received the University of Kansas Distinguished Service Award and was one of the 2011 recipients of the University of Kansas College of Liberal Arts & Sciences’ Distinguished Alumni Awards. Garden Club of America awarded him the Elizabeth Craig Weaver Proctor Medal in 2012.

In addition to lecturing nationwide and abroad, Dr. Jackson is involved outside The Land Institute with a variety of projects including being a Post Carbon Institute Fellow.


Lauren Bon 2008-0809_300dpi211

Lauren Bon, The Metabolic Studio

Sponsored by the Beach Museum of Art, the Prairie Studies Initiative, the Academic Excellence Fund, and the KSU Department of Art.

The Intermountain West and Beyond
Ten Year project in reconnecting Los Angeles with the water that feeds began with Not a Cornfield, 2005-2006 and culminates with her current work, Bending the River Back into the City. Ms. Bon’s practice looks at the Inter Mountain West—the vast landscape whose peaks and valleys include the Great Basin and three major rivers the Columbia, Colorado and Rio Grande River. Her talk will include both a description of her realized works and the context that her studio is working within to create a sustainable prophetic landscape in the Inter Mountain West.

 


Pre-Conference Speaker: David Abram

Sponsored by the Beach Museum of Art, the Prairie Studies Initiative, the Academic Excellence Fund, KSU Department of English, and K-State Libraries.

David Abram, cultural ecologist, geophilosopher and author

David Abram is a cultural ecologist and geophilosopher and author of Becoming Animal: An Earthly Cosmology and The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception and Language in a More-than-Human World. Hailed as “revolutionary” by the Los Angeles Times, as “daring” and “truly original” by Science, David’s work has helped catalyze the emergence of several new disciplines, including the burgeoning field of ecopsychology. His essays on the cultural causes and consequences of environmental disarray are published in numerous magazines, scholarly journals, and anthologies. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the Lannan Literary Award for Nonfiction, and fellowships from Rockefeller and Watson Foundations. In 2014, David holds the honorary Arne Naess Chair in Global Justice and Ecology at the University of Oslo, Norway.