2016 Symposia

Symposia

Posted schedules are as of September 26, 2016. Additional changes will be posted onsite.

Plenary Session
Oral Presentations & Symposia Schedule
Poster Presentation Schedule

Abstracts – as of July 6, 2016

American Elasmobranch Society

Biology and Ecology of Sawfishes

Sunday, July 16
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Location: TBD

Given the substantial declines experienced by all five sawfish species and their dramatically reduced ranges, sawfishes are among the most threatened fishes in the world. Because of their elongated, toothed rostrum, most of these declines are thought to have resulted primarily from bycatch due to their susceptibility to entanglement in gill nets and other coastal fisheries gear. Since bycatch is often so poorly documented, the declines may have been worse than once thought in some regions and the prospects for recovery even more dire. As a result, all sawfish species are currently listed as Endangered or Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. In addition, the IUCN Shark Specialist Group recently listed Pristidae as the most threatened elasmobranch family. In response to this situation, research has expanded tremendously over the last decade and has provided new insights into the taxonomy, distribution, biology, and ecology of sawfishes worldwide. The success of these research efforts has evolved into the formation of nine research groups on four continents with ongoing programs targeted at learning more about sawfishes and promoting their recovery. The goals of this symposium are (1) to bring international researchers and their collaborators together to communicate their latest results, (2) to have participants share their experiences and expertise working with fishes that are rare and inherently difficult to study, and (3) to foster the development of future collaborations. Presentations will feature information on a variety of topics such as telemetry, integrative multisensor tagging, feeding and trophic dynamics, age and growth, physiology, sensory biology, reproductive biology, population genetics, conservation, and management. There are over 50 researchers from 12 countries planning to participate in the full day symposium.

Chairs:
R. Dean Grubbs, Ph.D., Florida State University
Gregg R. Poulakis, Ph.D., Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission

American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists

Lessons From, and Visions For, Long-term Studies of Freshwater Fish Communities

Sunday, July 16
8:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Location: TBD

Long-term studies of freshwater fish communities provide valuable data for understanding community dynamics, responses to disturbance, conservation needs, and projected changes in community ecosystem effects under global change scenarios. Few systems have been studied in the very long term (over several decades), but the number of studies at the scale of decades is growing. The goal of this symposium is to encourage the continuation of existing studies and the initiation of new long-term studies by bringing together researchers with long-term fish community data and younger researchers and graduate students with interests in community studies.

Chair:
Edie Marsh-Matthews, Department of Biology, University of Oklahoma

 

ASIH at 100: Setting the Stage for the Next Hundred Years

Saturday, July 15
8:15 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: TBD

In 2013, the ASIH began a four-year celebration of its centennial, which will conclude in 2016. To augment other aspects of the Centennial Celebration being planned for the 2016 meetings and beyond (e.g., publications in Copeia documenting and discussing aspects of the history of ASIH), this special symposium for the Centennial meeting focuses on the ASIH and its role in the professions of Ichthyology and Herpetology. It is through the thoughts, ideas, and actions of the members of ASIH that this society has flourished and had such significant impact on the study of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles. It is therefore fitting that the society reflect on these 100 years through the perspectives of its membership. The relationship that each of us has to the ASIH is unique, and there is much to be learned from and discussed regarding the impact that the society has to each member. This is a particularly important discussion to have during the annual meeting, as about half of the participants are students and are the future of the ASIH. The goal of this symposium is not to only reflect on the past 100 years, but also to examine and discuss, by example, the role that the ASIH plays in the development of careers in Ichthyology and Herpetology, and how this can be carried into the future, to set the stage for the next 100 years of the ASIH.

Chair:
Eric J. Hilton, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William & Mary

 

Herpetologists’ League

Social Behavior in Reptiles: Secretive does not mean Asocial

Saturday, July 15
1:30-4:15 p.m.
Location: TBD

Although social behavior in vertebrates spans a continuum from solitary to highly social, taxa are often dichotomized as either ‘social’ or ‘non-social’. We argue that this social dichotomy is overly simplistic, neglects the diversity of vertebrate social systems, impedes our understanding of the evolution of social behavior, and perpetuates the erroneous belief that one group – the reptiles – is primarily ‘non-social’.

The symposium will unite researchers of social behavior of reptiles from around the world and those working on lizards, snakes, turtles and crocodiles. It will highlight the diversity and complexity of reptile social systems, and demonstrate how reptiles can contribute to our understanding of the evolution of vertebrate social behavior.

Chair:
Sean Doody, Department of Biological Sciences, Southeastern Louisiana University
Co-Chairs:
Gordon Burghardt, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee
Vladimir Dinets, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee

Herpetologists’ League
Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles
American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists

Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics Across Taxa: Fishes, Amphibians and Reptiles

Friday, July 14
10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: TBD

Evolution is driven by ecological differences. Just as obviously, ecological processes are influenced by evolution. Not so obvious is how these interactions play out on the short time scales most relevant to conservation and management. It is well established that ecological changes will lead to phenotypic changes in natural populations. These phenotypic changes can be substantial, particularly when humans are involved. What is not known generally is just how much of this phenotypic change is the result of evolution and how much is the result of phenotypic plasticity. Even less is known about how these contemporary phenotypic changes then influence ecological variables on similar time frames. Do ecological changes, such as invasive species or climate change, drive appreciable evolutionary change measureable in only years or decades? Does such evolution, in turn, influence ecological variables, such as population dynamics, community composition or ecosystem function, on similar time scales? These potential interactions between ecology and evolution represent the growing field of eco-evolutionary dynamics. Many of the best examples of eco-evolutionary dynamics come from studies of fishes, amphibians and reptiles. This symposium will showcase that research.

Chairs:
David M. Green, Redpath Museum, McGill University
Andrew Hendry, Redpath Museum, McGill University